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Color Of Change helps you do something real about injustice.

We design campaigns powerful enough to end practices that unfairly hold Black people back, and champion solutions that move us all forward. Until justice is real.
  • Music to Make Your Juneteenth Memorable

    This Juneteenth, celebrate with a free mix from DJ Tay paying homage to the Black experience. It's 98 minutes of Black history, Black joy, and Black liberation that pairs perfectly with some of the digital events we'll be hosting.
  • Divest from NYPD & Invest in NYC!

    We are calling on New York City Council members to immediately reallocate $1B of the NYPD’s $10B operational budget back to communities in NYC. Black New Yorkers shouldn't have to live in fear of the police.
  • Companies Need to Stand with Olympic Athlete Activists

    We are calling on corporate sponsors to stand up against the International Olympic Committee's Rule 50, which punishes athletes who raise their voice for change. We've come too far to tell Black athletes to “shut up and play.”
  • Biden, Protect Black Migrants

    The Biden Administration has sent 1,300 Haitian migrants including babies and pregnant women back to Haiti during a violent political crisis. Many more have been locked in cages in detention centers. For years the U.S. backed Haiti's dictatorship. We can't turn our back on Haitians now.
  • Tell Google to Conduct a Racial Equity Audit!

    Google was quick to issue statements of support for Black people following the murder of George Floyd, but their business practices tell a different story. They blocked ads tied to Black Lives Matter videos while allowing them for white nationalist groups.
  • Congress, Act to End Gun Violence

    Guns were the leading cause of death in 2019 for young adults 20-24, accounting for more the deaths of young Black men. We need Congress to act to protect communities targeted by gun violence. We’re calling on Congress to pass the American Jobs Plan.
  • Tell Biden to Eliminate Student Loan Debt

    For too long, Black people have been trapped in lifelong, impossible-to-repay student loans. With the pandemic, people are struggling just to make rent and stay afloat. Now's the time for our president to cancel student debt.
  • Stand with Justice for Greenwood!

    Tulsa’s leaders repeatedly denied reparations to the descendants and survivors of the Tulsa Race Massacre. Now, on the 100th anniversary, the Centennial Commission and city received $30 million for its celebration. We're demanding they give 80% to those still waiting for justice.
  • Protect Our Right to Protest for Racial Justice

    Tell your governor to say no. 34 states are introducing 81 new punitive anti-protest bills to try to roll back the people power that led to the biggest leap for racial justice in generations. We can't afford to go backwards now.

RECENT VICTORIES

  • Voting & Democracy

Olympic Athletes Can Now Take a Stand for Justice

Color Of Change has long supported trailblazing Olympians in their fight to dismantle oppressive policies that silence Black athletes. So we applaud the decision by the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee to allow political expression like raised fists and kneeling during the anthem in Tokyo this summer. We met with the committee staff, sent letters, launched a campaign — and now athletes can don phrases like “Black Lives Matter” “equality” and “justice.” In 2016, we stood up for Colin Kaepernick taking a knee. Today we’re asking corporate sponsors to stand with Gwen Berry, the Pan-American gold medalist who was abandoned by sponsors and lost 80% of her income after she raised her fist on the awards podium. And we’ll keep fighting for Black athletes’ right to raise their voices without sacrificing their careers — demanding the International Olympic Committee drop Rule 50, the rule punishing athletes for speaking out. This is an important marker towards justice and equality within sports.

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  • Tech Justice

Proud Boys Defunded & Kicked Off Social Media

A few days before a pro-Trump mob broke into the Capitol, Stripe processed $100,000 in donations to the Proud Boys, the white nationalist group Trump gave a shout-out to on live TV during the debates. Stripe put profit over public safety – funneling money to the group that funded interstate travel, tactical gear, and legal expenses. But after tens of thousands of Color Of Change members took action, Stripe decided to permanently suspend donations to the Proud Boys and indefinitely ban all accounts affiliated with the hate group. Our No Blood Money campaign to stop financial companies from profiting off of hate continues as we make sure Stripe keeps its promise to working with violent hate groups and GiveSendGo, the fundraising site used by white nationalists like Kyle Rittenhouse and Officer Derek Chauvin. 

  • social list opener
  • Tech Justice

Social Media Sites Ban Trump

Last week, Twitter, the social media site instrumental to President Trump’s rise, permanently banned his account. This is huge. For the last 4 years, Trump has turned to Twitter to spread misinformation and lies, incite violence, announce ad hoc policies, and antagonize those who disagree with him. For years, Color Of Change has been working to hold Twitter and Facebook accountable for white nationalist organizing on their platforms. And for weeks, groups like the Proud Boys were plotting their attack on the Capitol on social media. Finally, tech execs are listening. After Trump’s armed followers broke into the Capitol and Congress had to be evacuated, we reached out leaders at both companies, telling them to shut Trump down. Facebook has suspended Trump until the end of his term. This is where real accountability begins. For too long, we’d been warning this was bound to happen. We cannot afford to let Americans live in two realities, undermining the sovereignty of our elections, peddling hate for profit, and enabling armed revolt against peaceful leaders.

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Color Of Change helps people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force driven by 7 million members, we move decision makers in corporations and government to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people, and all people. Until justice is real.

IN THE MEDIA

March 3, 2021

The Black in Fashion Council Has Set Up a Road Map for Real Change in the Industry

The Black In Fashion Council was launched in July to propel the advancement of Black people in fashion and beauty. Now they’ve set out a plan of action. #ChangeFashion includes a roadmap and resources for racial equity in the fashion industry. Their statement says, “The goal of #ChangeFashion is to chart a course for industry change, and partner with executives, influencers and talent to make change a reality. It is a collaboration between those working for change on the inside of the industry, such as the Black in Fashion Council, and a powerful force for racial justice advocacy on the outside: Color Of Change. We can and must transform the fashion world as we know it, and make fashion a positive force for good—for everyone.”

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March 2, 2021

The Fashion World Promised More Diversity

The New York Times works to track progress in an industry where Black representation has been rare. They asked 64 brands, 15 department stores, and fashion magazines questions about the number of Black people on their executive team, boards, and staff—as well as in their ad campaigns and on their runways, shelves and magazine covers. The stats, and responses from Black creatives in fashion, show that the industry has a long way to go to increase representation, value Black talent, and avoid tokenizing Black models. That’s why Color Of Chang joined with the Black in Fashion Council, IMG joined, and supermodel Joan Smalls to launch #ChangeFashion, a racial justice initiative to transform the industry.

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March 1, 2021

New Instagram Filter Lets You Erect Monuments to Civil Rights Activists

Last spring, our nation began a long overdue conversation over the hundreds of Confederate statues and monuments across the country. Now we’re tackling a new question: who deserves to be remembered? The Pedestal Project is using augmented reality to honor 3 civil rights leaders: John Lewis, Alicia Garza, and Chelsea Miller. On Instagram, users can choose from a gallery of statues to project the image in the real world and hear a message from the activists. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson is quoted: “In their time, white nationalist officials erected statues of Confederate leaders for a reason – to send a message about who should dominate this country, and to put Black people in our place. It’s not enough to remove them, we must replace them with symbols of a just vision of America.”

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March 1, 2021

Ahmaud Arbery’s Death Sparked Some Policy Change, But 1 Year Later His Family Still Awaits Justice

One year later, justice for Ahmaud Arbery remains elusive–even with leadership changes in Georgia. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson says the justice system is unequal and has historically allowed white people to get away with killing Black people. He says the nation needs more policies that ensure accountability for every case involving racist violence and more investment in Black communities. “When the killer is white and the victim is Black in communities around the country, justice isn’t served,” Robinson said. “There is nothing new about what happened to Ahmaud Arbery.”

  • social list opener
March 1, 2021

Fashion May Actually Become More Equitable, Thanks in Part to Joan Smalls

This articles talks about why the Black in Fashion Council was created and the launch of #ChangeFashion with supermodel Joan Smalls and talent agency IMG. Its aim is to make the fashion industry more equitable by wielding its economic and cultural power. A hallmark of #ChangeFashion is to make it easy for companies to make measurable progress with a roadmap for taking action. The first recommendation is to hire independent security for photo shoots and events rather than police. The others all focus on investment, into Black representation, portrayals, talent, careers, and communities.

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February 28, 2021

George Floyd’s Killing Started a Movement. 9 Months Later, What’s Changed?

George Floyd’s legacy will determine which America the next generation grows up in: one where record numbers of voters elect a Black woman to the White House or one where Breonna Taylor’s killer doesn’t face trial, but the officer who shot her neighbors’ wall does. As jury selection begins for the trial of Derek Chauvin, the House is set to vote on the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. It would ban chokeholds, end racial and religious profiling, eliminate qualified immunity for cops and mandate data collection on police encounters. Erika Maye, Color Of Change’s Deputy Dir. of Criminal Justice says, “It was really heartbreaking to see just how little progress was made to the point where a police officer could kneel on someone for almost 9 minutes, with people videotaping—and they could see folks filming them, with the whole world watching and not care.”

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Strategic Initiatives

Democracy & Census

Black people have the power to shape our democracy and set the agenda when they speak up and turn out in elections. Through our Black Brunches we have brought together more than 20,000 people across 20 cities—including many new to politics. Going into 2020, we have tremendous opportunities to register new voters, protect voting rights, and make sure our communities are counted and represented in the 2020 Census. We are engaging local leaders and our 1.7M members to help set a progressive agenda around criminal justice reform and boost civic participation in Black communities.

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Winning Justice

No one holds more power in our justice system than prosecutors. They decide who to prosecute, what the charges will be, and routinely make decisions that destroy Black people’s lives. We are ushering in a new era of prosecutor accountability by mobilizing Black communities across the country. Already, we've pushed prosecutors and candidates in a dozen cities make pledges to cut incarceration. We continue to build momentum to end the most unjust, destructive and racist practices in our system from money bail to over-sentencing, over-policing, and sending our children to adult prisons.

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COC Hollywood

TV and film play a profound role in shaping American culture. Yet, when it comes to representation of Black people, culture, and issues, far too much of the content Hollywood produces promotes dangerous misunderstandings that holds back racial justice in the real world. COC Hollywood is our initiative to change the rules in Hollywood by ensuring accurate, diverse, empathetic and human portrayals of Black people onscreen. We consult on film and TV projects, partner with changemakers inside the industry, work to raise standards around hiring and diversity, and elevate Black stories.

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