About Color Of Change

 

Color Of Change is an evolving, dynamic culture with a fire for increasing impact. Our work is as strong as our people are innovative and persistent—a fresh, talented team spread across Oakland, New York, Hollywood and Washington, D.C. We grow our talent through staff development, as well as new hires and partnerships. We care about talent because increasing talent increases impact: winning more campaigns, taking on new issues, strengthening our public voice, and finding news ways to build greater power for Black people in all the places we need it.

If you are reading this, you believe in racial justice, you believe in Black brilliance, you believe we should leave no one in silence. And you believe in the power of strategic, creative, digital organizing campaigns to change the society we live in. If you are as passionate as we are, and you have skills, experience and drive to make a difference, we want to hear from you. Tell us about your experience in doing any of the things we do: strategy, organizing and engagement, media and storytelling, technology and organizational growth. Let us know who you are.

We are a Black-led organization with a powerful multi-racial team, made stronger by our ability to collaborate and leverage our diversity across gender, age, upbringing, education, talent and life experience. We are committed to high standards, high impact and working with deep respect for one another, our members and our partners. Until justice is real.


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In the Media

How white TV writers decide the stories Hollywood tells America
  • Washington Post

How white TV writers decide the stories Hollywood tells America

Hollywood prides itself on its progressive politics. Celebrities sported blue ribbons on the red carpet at the Emmy Awards to signal their resistance to President Trump. However, the self-congratulatory liberal bastion has its own problems with diversity, particularly in regards to the showrunners — executive producers and head writers who make hiring decisions — and TV writers who shape storylines and characters, according to a report commissioned by the racial justice organization Color of Change.