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Color Of Change helps you do something real about injustice.

We design campaigns powerful enough to end practices that unfairly hold Black people back, and champion solutions that move us all forward. Until justice is real.
  • It's Time to Redefine Community Safety

    Communities know what keeps them safe — and it’s not police. This is what public safety could and should look like. Read our guide on how the federal government can advance community safety with evidence-based policies we developed with Civil Rights Corps and Vera Action.
  • Justice for Keenan Anderson!

    31-year-old Keenan Anderson, a father and schoolteacher, died after being needlessly tased by LAPD. Keenan flagged down police after a minor traffic accident and was treated like a criminal. He was held face down on the asphalt, and repeatedly tased as he begged for his life. He went into cardiac arrest and died. We're fighting to restrict the use of Tasers and remove LAPD Chief Michel Moore.
  • Divest from Cop City!

    For weeks, activists have occupied the site for Cop City in Weelaunee Forest to try to halt construction. On Jan. 18, GA state police shot and killed one of them. As the movement against Cop City's grown, police have become violent with protesters. It's time corporations like Target, Wells Fargo, and Truist Bank pull their financial support of the project through the Atlanta Police Foundation.
  • Demand Applebee’s Increase Wages

    The racial wage gap has gotten worse since pandemic. Workers at Applebee’s in New York, Alabama and Illinois are demanding the restaurant chain pay workers at locations in non-white neighborhoods what they pay workers in predominantly white ones. All workers deserve safe working conditions and a livable wage.
  • Stop Selling Toxic Hair Care Products!

    A National Institute of Environmental Health study shows chemical hair straighteners increase the risk of uterine cancer. Lye-based relaxers contain hormone-disrupting chemicals that trigger breast cancer too. Black hair care products are killing women. But companies won't change their ingredients without pressure from big retailers!
  • Tell Advertisers: Keep Twitter Safe

    Within hours of Musk taking over Twitter, use of the n-word rose skyrocketed. Musk has supported restoring Trump's account. We cannot trust him to protect users from hate, harassment and misinformation. GM and L'Oréal have suspended their advertising. Let's push Disney and Coca-Cola to follow suit!
  • Tell Congress to Support the Black Tech Agenda!

    We can create an Internet where Black people thrive. Check out the Black Tech Agenda — a roadmap for racial equity in tech regulation. Big Tech has chased profits no matter the cos: cyber-bullying, misinformation, real world violence to Brown and Black people. But these 6 principles lay the groundwork for accountability.

RECENT VICTORIES

  • Tech Justice

Facebook Holds Its First Civil Rights Audit

This year we’ve worked tirelessly to hold Facebook accountable – persuading them to conduct their first civil rights audit and pressing them to adopt stronger policies against white supremacist content. We’ve held dozens of meetings, drawing their attention to how the platform has been used to censor Black activists and allow ads that discriminate against Black people. The fight continues. But Facebook has begun restricting racial targeting in ads, removing posts by white nationalists, and taken down posts meant to suppress voting.

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  • Media Justice

COC Members Save Disney’s Black Princess

We persuaded Disney not to whitewash their popular Black character Princess Tiana. When we saw early drawings of Tiana from the sequel to Wreck-It Ralph, it was clear they had straightened her hair, thinned her nose, and lightened her skin. Our members spoke out and persuaded Disney to keep Tiana a beautiful Black princess – part of our ongoing work to improve representation of Black characters in film and TV and make sure all children see heroes who look like them onscreen.

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  • Criminal Justice

NYPD Officer Fired for Murdering Eric Garner

Five years after the tragic and unnecessary death of Eric Garner, NYC mayor and police commissioner fired Daniel Pantaleo, the officer who put Garner in a chokehold and refused to let him go. COC members were part of a powerful coalition with dozens of groups around New York demanding justice. Though Garner’s death was ruled a homicide, until now the officers who restrained him had walked away with no consequences and their jobs intact.

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Color Of Change helps people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force driven by 7 million members, we move decision makers in corporations and government to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people, and all people. Until justice is real.

IN THE MEDIA

March 5, 2021

Color Of Change Says Golden Globes Symbolize Hollywood’s Broken Promises On Diversity

COC President Rashad Robinson writes about Hollywood’s failure to make good on its promises on inclusion. “This week we are reminded that Hollywood, despite its calls for change, continues to reinforce systems that overlook Black people’s creative luminosity in favor of the status quo. After the Golden Globe nominations and egregious snubs of Black creators and actors, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the group responsible for choosing honorees, confirmed that it has zero Black members…. Despite the momentum and a year of particularly brilliant work by Black creatives, little has shifted. Removing barriers for Black people to produce and share content must be accompanied by Black people being rewarded for success — in terms of pay equity and credit, and yes, awards.”

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March 3, 2021

The Black in Fashion Council Has Set Up a Road Map for Real Change in the Industry

The Black In Fashion Council was launched in July to propel the advancement of Black people in fashion and beauty. Now they’ve set out a plan of action. #ChangeFashion includes a roadmap and resources for racial equity in the fashion industry. Their statement says, “The goal of #ChangeFashion is to chart a course for industry change, and partner with executives, influencers and talent to make change a reality. It is a collaboration between those working for change on the inside of the industry, such as the Black in Fashion Council, and a powerful force for racial justice advocacy on the outside: Color Of Change. We can and must transform the fashion world as we know it, and make fashion a positive force for good—for everyone.”

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March 2, 2021

The Fashion World Promised More Diversity

The New York Times works to track progress in an industry where Black representation has been rare. They asked 64 brands, 15 department stores, and fashion magazines questions about the number of Black people on their executive team, boards, and staff—as well as in their ad campaigns and on their runways, shelves and magazine covers. The stats, and responses from Black creatives in fashion, show that the industry has a long way to go to increase representation, value Black talent, and avoid tokenizing Black models. That’s why Color Of Chang joined with the Black in Fashion Council, IMG joined, and supermodel Joan Smalls to launch #ChangeFashion, a racial justice initiative to transform the industry.

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March 1, 2021

New Instagram Filter Lets You Erect Monuments to Civil Rights Activists

Last spring, our nation began a long overdue conversation over the hundreds of Confederate statues and monuments across the country. Now we’re tackling a new question: who deserves to be remembered? The Pedestal Project is using augmented reality to honor 3 civil rights leaders: John Lewis, Alicia Garza, and Chelsea Miller. On Instagram, users can choose from a gallery of statues to project the image in the real world and hear a message from the activists. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson is quoted: “In their time, white nationalist officials erected statues of Confederate leaders for a reason – to send a message about who should dominate this country, and to put Black people in our place. It’s not enough to remove them, we must replace them with symbols of a just vision of America.”

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March 1, 2021

Ahmaud Arbery’s Death Sparked Some Policy Change, But 1 Year Later His Family Still Awaits Justice

One year later, justice for Ahmaud Arbery remains elusive–even with leadership changes in Georgia. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson says the justice system is unequal and has historically allowed white people to get away with killing Black people. He says the nation needs more policies that ensure accountability for every case involving racist violence and more investment in Black communities. “When the killer is white and the victim is Black in communities around the country, justice isn’t served,” Robinson said. “There is nothing new about what happened to Ahmaud Arbery.”

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March 1, 2021

Fashion May Actually Become More Equitable, Thanks in Part to Joan Smalls

This articles talks about why the Black in Fashion Council was created and the launch of #ChangeFashion with supermodel Joan Smalls and talent agency IMG. Its aim is to make the fashion industry more equitable by wielding its economic and cultural power. A hallmark of #ChangeFashion is to make it easy for companies to make measurable progress with a roadmap for taking action. The first recommendation is to hire independent security for photo shoots and events rather than police. The others all focus on investment, into Black representation, portrayals, talent, careers, and communities.

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