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Color Of Change helps you do something real about injustice.

We design campaigns powerful enough to end practices that unfairly hold Black people back, and champion solutions that move us all forward. Until justice is real.
  • Support Black Athletes in Tokyo

    Download our 2021 Athletes and Activism Olympic Watch Party Toolkit. Learn more about the history of Black activism, our demands to get the International Olympic Committee to stop silencing Black athletes, and host your own watch party.
  • Support Black Women Athletes

    Sha’Carri Richardson & Brianna Rollins-McNeal should be going to Tokyo. But the US Anti-Doping Agency is invoking archaic “war on drugs” rules to suspend both women for marijuana use--in a state where it's legal--putting their careers in jeopardy.
  • Demand Biden Grant Clemency for 4,000 Elders!

    50k COC members spoke up and helped free Gwen Levi, a 76-year old grandmother and cancer survivor who was re-incarcerated after missing a phone call from her case manager. Let's free all elders on home confinement.
  • Companies Should Stand with Olympic Athlete Activists

    We are calling on corporate sponsors to stand up against the International Olympic Committee's Rule 50, which punishes athletes who raise their voice for change. We've come too far to tell Black athletes to “shut up and play.”
  • Facebook, Adopt Civil Rights Recs

    A year ago we persuaded 1,200 corporations to boycott advertising on Facebook for their failure to stop racism and white nationalist organizing on their platform. The company conducted a civil rights audit--but refuses to adopt most of the recommendations in it.
  • Tell Abbott, Pardon George Floyd

    A year's passed since George Floyd was murdered and there are STILL charges on the books against him in Texas—for allegedly selling $10 worth of drugs. We are calling on the TX Board of Pardons & Paroles and Gov. Greg Abbott to posthumously pardon Floyd.
  • The Time to Vote on H.R. 40 Is Now

    We need Congress to pass legislation addressing the impacts of slavery. With 190 co-sponsors and a vow to “study reparations,” there is unprecedented support for H.R. 40. The time to vote is now! Call your rep in Congress to move this bill forward.
  • Divest from NYPD & Invest in NYC!

    We are calling on New York City Council members to immediately reallocate $1B of the NYPD’s $10B operational budget back to communities in NYC. Black New Yorkers shouldn't have to live in fear of the police.
  • Tell Google to Conduct a Racial Equity Audit!

    Google was quick to issue statements of support for Black people following the murder of George Floyd, but their business practices tell a different story. They blocked ads tied to Black Lives Matter videos while allowing them for white nationalist groups.
  • Public Safety Is a Public Health Issue

    America's police-driven approach to public safety is not working, esp. not for Black communities. For years, activists urged us to rethink how we keep communities safe. Now US Rep. Cori Bush introduced the People’s Response Act to protect people. Tell your Representative to cosponsor it.
  • Tell Biden to Eliminate Student Loan Debt

    For too long, Black people have been trapped in lifelong, impossible-to-repay student loans. With the pandemic, people are struggling just to make rent and stay afloat. Now's the time for our president to cancel student debt.
  • Protect Our Right to Protest for Racial Justice

    Tell your governor to say no. 34 states are introducing 81 new punitive anti-protest bills to try to roll back the people power that led to the biggest leap for racial justice in generations. We can't afford to go backwards now.

RECENT VICTORIES

  • Voting & Democracy

Victory for Poll Workers in GA

All eyes are on Georgia’s runoff elections where the fate of the Senate hangs in the balance. After poll workers–many of whom are Black women–were harassed, Color Of Change launched a campaign with UltraViolet. Together we demanded Facebook shut down the right-wing groups targeting poll workers, reminding execs that online harassment leads to real-world violence. Some poll workers received death threats; one even found a noose outside his home with his name on it. Recently Facebook announced poll workers will now be included in their Protect Program, given extra safety and privacy protections. Poll workers defend our democracy; they should never have to live in fear. The fight is not over as the move came only after immense pressure from Color Of Change and partners. We continue to press Facebook to stop putting Black lives and votes at risk. 

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  • Criminal Justice

Tampa’s District Attorney Drops Bogus Charges Against COC & BLM Organizers

This summer, Tampa’s Police Department systematically tried to intimidate and harass Black activists. On August 22, the sheriff violently arrested a Color Of Change organizer in her home and arrested 3 other organizers – all on trumped-up, bogus charges. This was clearly meant to instill fear in activists fighting for racial justice. These tactics are not unique to Tampa. We’ve seen local police and federal agents target protesters in Portland, New York, Chicago, and St. Louis too. 50,000 Color Of Change members joined our campaign to drop the prosecution of the protesters and fire the police chief. Less than 2 weeks later, the Hillsborough State Attorney dropped the charges. We hope it sends a signal to Tampa police that there will be consequences for harassing and intimidating Black protesters.

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  • Tech Justice

Google Blocks Proud Boys’ Website & Online Store

We were all horrified when, on live TV during the presidential debates, President Trump told the Proud Boys to “stand back and stand by” instead of condemning white nationalists. But Color Of Change’s work to pressure tech companies to take responsibility for how their platforms are used is having an impact. Google quickly moved to get a Google Cloud Services customer to remove the Proud Boys’ site and online store – effectively cutting off the hate group from new money and potential members. They also worked with us when news broke about the Wolverine Watchmen, the group plotting to kidnap Michigan Governor Whitmer. We cannot let domestic terrorists build power online. It’s time for tech companies to create systems to proactively root out racist, extremist behavior on their platforms, instead of waiting for groups like Color Of Change to call them out.

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Color Of Change helps people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force driven by 7 million members, we move decision makers in corporations and government to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people, and all people. Until justice is real.

IN THE MEDIA

March 2, 2021

The Fashion World Promised More Diversity

The New York Times works to track progress in an industry where Black representation has been rare. They asked 64 brands, 15 department stores, and fashion magazines questions about the number of Black people on their executive team, boards, and staff—as well as in their ad campaigns and on their runways, shelves and magazine covers. The stats, and responses from Black creatives in fashion, show that the industry has a long way to go to increase representation, value Black talent, and avoid tokenizing Black models. That’s why Color Of Chang joined with the Black in Fashion Council, IMG joined, and supermodel Joan Smalls to launch #ChangeFashion, a racial justice initiative to transform the industry.

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March 1, 2021

New Instagram Filter Lets You Erect Monuments to Civil Rights Activists

Last spring, our nation began a long overdue conversation over the hundreds of Confederate statues and monuments across the country. Now we’re tackling a new question: who deserves to be remembered? The Pedestal Project is using augmented reality to honor 3 civil rights leaders: John Lewis, Alicia Garza, and Chelsea Miller. On Instagram, users can choose from a gallery of statues to project the image in the real world and hear a message from the activists. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson is quoted: “In their time, white nationalist officials erected statues of Confederate leaders for a reason – to send a message about who should dominate this country, and to put Black people in our place. It’s not enough to remove them, we must replace them with symbols of a just vision of America.”

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March 1, 2021

Ahmaud Arbery’s Death Sparked Some Policy Change, But 1 Year Later His Family Still Awaits Justice

One year later, justice for Ahmaud Arbery remains elusive–even with leadership changes in Georgia. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson says the justice system is unequal and has historically allowed white people to get away with killing Black people. He says the nation needs more policies that ensure accountability for every case involving racist violence and more investment in Black communities. “When the killer is white and the victim is Black in communities around the country, justice isn’t served,” Robinson said. “There is nothing new about what happened to Ahmaud Arbery.”

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March 1, 2021

Fashion May Actually Become More Equitable, Thanks in Part to Joan Smalls

This articles talks about why the Black in Fashion Council was created and the launch of #ChangeFashion with supermodel Joan Smalls and talent agency IMG. Its aim is to make the fashion industry more equitable by wielding its economic and cultural power. A hallmark of #ChangeFashion is to make it easy for companies to make measurable progress with a roadmap for taking action. The first recommendation is to hire independent security for photo shoots and events rather than police. The others all focus on investment, into Black representation, portrayals, talent, careers, and communities.

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February 28, 2021

George Floyd’s Killing Started a Movement. 9 Months Later, What’s Changed?

George Floyd’s legacy will determine which America the next generation grows up in: one where record numbers of voters elect a Black woman to the White House or one where Breonna Taylor’s killer doesn’t face trial, but the officer who shot her neighbors’ wall does. As jury selection begins for the trial of Derek Chauvin, the House is set to vote on the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. It would ban chokeholds, end racial and religious profiling, eliminate qualified immunity for cops and mandate data collection on police encounters. Erika Maye, Color Of Change’s Deputy Dir. of Criminal Justice says, “It was really heartbreaking to see just how little progress was made to the point where a police officer could kneel on someone for almost 9 minutes, with people videotaping—and they could see folks filming them, with the whole world watching and not care.”

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February 28, 2021

IMG, Joan Smalls, Black In Fashion Council Join Forces with Color Of Change for #ChangeFashion

#ChangeFashion invites companies to take responsibility for their impact on the world and provides concrete steps that will ensure the industry is working toward racial justice. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson is quoted: “Fighting racism can’t just be the trend of the season. And there are two fronts to the fight: ending the longstanding discrimination and mistreatment of Black creators and other professionals working across the industry and ending the longstanding pattern of misrepresenting Black bodies and diminishing Black lives, which perpetuates the dehumanization of Black people in society at large. Color Of Change is proud to work in partnership with any organization that is serious about doing what it takes to drive real change.”

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Strategic Initiatives

Democracy & Census

Black people have the power to shape our democracy and set the agenda when they speak up and turn out in elections. Through our Black Brunches we have brought together more than 20,000 people across 20 cities—including many new to politics. Going into 2020, we have tremendous opportunities to register new voters, protect voting rights, and make sure our communities are counted and represented in the 2020 Census. We are engaging local leaders and our 1.7M members to help set a progressive agenda around criminal justice reform and boost civic participation in Black communities.

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Winning Justice

No one holds more power in our justice system than prosecutors. They decide who to prosecute, what the charges will be, and routinely make decisions that destroy Black people’s lives. We are ushering in a new era of prosecutor accountability by mobilizing Black communities across the country. Already, we've pushed prosecutors and candidates in a dozen cities make pledges to cut incarceration. We continue to build momentum to end the most unjust, destructive and racist practices in our system from money bail to over-sentencing, over-policing, and sending our children to adult prisons.

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COC Hollywood

TV and film play a profound role in shaping American culture. Yet, when it comes to representation of Black people, culture, and issues, far too much of the content Hollywood produces promotes dangerous misunderstandings that holds back racial justice in the real world. COC Hollywood is our initiative to change the rules in Hollywood by ensuring accurate, diverse, empathetic and human portrayals of Black people onscreen. We consult on film and TV projects, partner with changemakers inside the industry, work to raise standards around hiring and diversity, and elevate Black stories.

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