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Color Of Change helps you do something real about injustice.

We design campaigns powerful enough to end practices that unfairly hold Black people back, and champion solutions that move us all forward. Until justice is real.
  • A Toolkit for Reimagining Safety

    One year after George Floyd was murdered, our fight continues to alter a system that continues to threaten, harm, and kill Black people. Chauvin's trial may be over, but the movement for racial justice is not. See how we're advocating for systemic change.
  • Stand with Justice for Greenwood!

    Tulsa’s leaders repeatedly denied reparations to the descendants and survivors of the Tulsa Race Massacre. Now, on the 100th anniversary, the Centennial Commission and city received $30 million for its celebration. We're demanding they give 80% to those still waiting for justice.
  • DOJ, Investigate the Minneapolis PD

    One guilty verdict for one officer is not enough. Chauvin isn't the only abusive cop in Minneapolis. We’re calling on the DOJ to investigate police departments with a track record of threatening Black lives — for civil rights violations and inappropriate use of force.
  • Fire the Cop Who Killed Daunte

    Brooklyn police officer Kim Potter murdered Daunte Wright. And she knows how to cover it up because she helped other cops avoid accountability as a former police union president. She resigned to try to escape punishment but we continue to fight for justice.
  • Congress, End Qualified Immunity

    Qualified immunity stops us from holding police officers accountable for the lives they've taken and harms they’ve inflicted on Black people. We need accountability — to do that, we have to repeal laws that unfairly protect police.
  • Biden, Protect Black Migrants

    The Biden Administration has sent 1,300 Haitian migrants including babies and pregnant women back to Haiti during a violent political crisis. Many more have been locked in cages in detention centers. For years the U.S. backed Haiti's dictatorship. We can't turn our back on Haitians now.
  • Black Patients' Guide to COVID-19 Vaccine Out Now

    Color Of Change teamed up Dr. Ruth Arumala to share best practices for combatting COVID-19 in the Black community. Get answers to your questions about the vaccine, distribution, and how to protect yourself.
  • Tell Biden to Eliminate Student Debt

    For too long, Black people have been trapped in lifelong, impossible-to-repay student loans. With the pandemic, people are struggling just to make rent and stay afloat. Now's the time for our president to cancel student debt.
  • Hold Companies Accountable for the Insurrection

    Toyota, JetBlue, AT&T, T-Mobile and Cigna are backing out of promises to pull funding from members of Congress who supported the insurrection in January. This is unacceptable. We're demanding they stop funding hate.
  • We Need to Regulate Big Tech!

    For years, we’ve wondered why Google, Facebook, and Twitter won’t stop promoting the kinds of conspiracy theories that led to the attack on the Capitol. The reason? Their platforms are built to foster engagement and growth — at ALL costs. It's time for legislation.

RECENT VICTORIES

  • Tech Justice

AirBNB Launches Project to Expose & Reign in Discrimination on its Platform

After a year of Color Of Change working with AirBNB to address housing discrimination online, the company has launched Project Lighthouse—an initiative to expose, track, and stop discrimination by people renting or reserving apartments on their site. Its goal is to figure out how names and profile photos create a perception of a person’s race, then use that information to develop new features that ensure people of color are treated fairly and equally on AirBNB. The company plans to create a tech team whose job is to fight bias, have hosts confirm reservations before seeing guests’ photos, and recruit more people of color to host. AirBNB also set new benchmarks for increasing the number of people of color on their staff and Board of Directors to boost diversity there. 

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  • Economic Justice

Target Raises Minimum Wage, Making COVID-19 Pay Increase Permanent

After Color Of Change sent a demand letter urging Target to pay their frontline employees a living wage, the company agreed to raise its base wage to $15 an hour. That means full-time and part-time employees will benefit from the $2 “hazard pay” increase announced during COVID-19. While Target saw a surge in sales and largely kept stores open during the pandemic, their workers have raised concerns about hazard pay and health benefits. This is part of our ongoing work to show companies pledging to fight racism and injustice how they can start with the way they value and compensate their own employees, many of whom are people of color. Before we spoke out, Target’s salary bump was slated to expire in July—as many retailers are phasing out their pandemic bonuses.

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  • Coronavirus Response

DoorDash to Drive Business to Black-Owned Restaurants Hurt by COVID-19

After Color Of Change led a survey on how Black and Latino businesses are faring during the pandemic, DoorDash agreed to create a new feature highlighting Black-owned restaurants. They will be working with us on a program to support and drive customers to Black merchants on the app and to reduce bias on their platform.

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Color Of Change helps people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force driven by 7 million members, we move decision makers in corporations and government to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people, and all people. Until justice is real.

IN THE MEDIA

December 26, 2020

Shifting Corporate Culture in 2021: 5 Tactics to Foster a More Inclusive Internal Workplace

In 2020, after the murder of George Floyd, nearly every major corporation pledged their commitment to solving racial inequity. But what can they really do? Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson says it’s important to fix the systems that exclude Black people rather than trying to blame or change people. The most productive areas to focus on are: hiring, promotions, and performance reviews that influence career mobility; equity in who gets to represent the company externally; and investing resources in accountability.

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December 25, 2020

PPP Loans Were Supposed to Prioritize Low-Income Areas During the Pandemic

Congress says it wanted the US Small Business Administration to ensure that PPP loans prioritized small businesses in “underserved” markets, meaning low-income communities, rural areas and businesses owned by people of color, women and veterans. But by time it told lenders that, nearly all the loans had been issued. A survey by Color Of Change and UnidosUS found Black and Hispanic business owners were often denied help, and many feared their firms would not last the year. COC’s Vice President Arisha Hatch is quoted, “Instead of providing desperately needed relief to qualifying small businesses, the PPP propped up so many barriers and reinforced so many racial inequities.”

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December 15, 2020

How One Writers’ Room Is Rethinking Policing on TV

The Hollywood Reporter looks at Color Of Change Hollywood’s work–releasing Normalizing Injustice and going behind the scenes to work with TV writers and producers. One writers’ room at a time, the group is shifting how policing is portrayed on TV and pushing Hollywood to tell the truth about what Black people experience at the hands of law enforcement and our criminal justice system. “What we see on TV impacts the way we vote, the way we react to people and even whether we believe Black Lives Matter is a terrorist organization,” says Culture & Entertainment Director Kristen Marston.

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December 15, 2020

Harris Smashing Glass Ceiling Is Victory for Women of Color

Kamala Harris has broken through one of the final glass ceilings for women with this election, becoming the first female vice president in the US. A record 130 Black women were congressional candidates this election cycle and Black women were a driving force behind Biden’s victory over Trump. Color Of Change Vice President Arisha Hatch says the support of Black women must be reflected in Biden’s policy agenda. “When we’re talking to Black women, especially out in the field, they want to see a competent response to a pandemic… They want to see shifts in the way that our families are policed, overpoliced and overincarcerated. … They want to be able to put food on the tables for their kids and send them to schools that are not only safe but allow their children to live their best lives in the future.”

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December 10, 2020

Let’s Talk About The Black Vote

Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson is interviewed by Brian Lehrer in the wake of Biden-Harris’s historic victory. Rashad talks about the powerful message this sends to politicians who base their campaigns in demonizing immigrants and people of color. He says, “Racial justice helped to propel this win. We had seen a bottoming out of enthusiasm (in voter registration) until the uprisings the summer…. We saw those people then to go to polls. We saw real changes in prosecutor offices across the country from big wins in Chicago and LA and Orlando and across Georgia.”

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December 5, 2020

President-Elect Joe Biden’s Transition Team Is One of the Most Diverse Ever

Biden wants his administration to “look like America.” His transition team is a start. So far, 46 percent of Biden’s transition staff are people of color and more than half — 52 percent — are women. Advocates say they welcome the administration’s focus on representation but that is just a first step. They’ll be keeping an eye on Biden’s policy proposals. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson is quoted, “How that representation translates into what they deliver is what’s most important to me. We are going to look for who’s going to stand up to corporate power.”

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Strategic Initiatives

Democracy & Census

Black people have the power to shape our democracy and set the agenda when they speak up and turn out in elections. Through our Black Brunches we have brought together more than 20,000 people across 20 cities—including many new to politics. Going into 2020, we have tremendous opportunities to register new voters, protect voting rights, and make sure our communities are counted and represented in the 2020 Census. We are engaging local leaders and our 1.7M members to help set a progressive agenda around criminal justice reform and boost civic participation in Black communities.

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Winning Justice

No one holds more power in our justice system than prosecutors. They decide who to prosecute, what the charges will be, and routinely make decisions that destroy Black people’s lives. We are ushering in a new era of prosecutor accountability by mobilizing Black communities across the country. Already, we've pushed prosecutors and candidates in a dozen cities make pledges to cut incarceration. We continue to build momentum to end the most unjust, destructive and racist practices in our system from money bail to over-sentencing, over-policing, and sending our children to adult prisons.

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COC Hollywood

TV and film play a profound role in shaping American culture. Yet, when it comes to representation of Black people, culture, and issues, far too much of the content Hollywood produces promotes dangerous misunderstandings that holds back racial justice in the real world. COC Hollywood is our initiative to change the rules in Hollywood by ensuring accurate, diverse, empathetic and human portrayals of Black people onscreen. We consult on film and TV projects, partner with changemakers inside the industry, work to raise standards around hiring and diversity, and elevate Black stories.

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