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Color Of Change helps you do something real about injustice.

We design campaigns powerful enough to end practices that unfairly hold Black people back, and champion solutions that move us all forward. Until justice is real.
  • Join Our Health, Wealth & Power Community Event

    This Art Basel, join us for Health, Wealth + Power -- a virtual journey and immersive experience with 4 groundbreaking artists. The exhibit is sure to captivate the mind and illuminate ideas to redefine policing and safety for Black people. It'll be up December 3rd + 4th 10am - 8pm EST.
  • Tell Lawmakers to Break Up Facebook!

    Today tech is dominated by a few mega-companies. We’ve watched Facebook, Google, and Amazon get bigger and bigger. These monopolies leave us at risk; it's why we still have to deal with misinformation and voter suppression online. It's time for antitrust reform!
  • Protect Racial Justice Protestors!

    Wisconsin is protecting a violent white supremacist over the safety of protestors. Kyle Rittenhouse was declared not guilty for 2 murders -- 0 accountability for taking protestors' lives. Wisconsin's leaders need to make a public commitment to squashing any anti-protest bills that put racial justice protesters in danger.
  • Stop Funding Police Foundations!

    Police foundations are a threat to democracy and Black lives. And you know their sponsors: Verizon, Walmart, Starbucks, Amazon, Bank of America, Target, AT&T, Uber among others. We can't let companies say they support Black people and keep giving to those who harm us.
  • Monopolies Stifle Black Communities

    Monopolies are why healthcare and medication costs continue to skyrocket, why misinformation is still rampant on Facebook, and why small Black-owned businesses struggle to compete. We're asking Congress to invest in antitrust laws that will help promote racial justice.

RECENT VICTORIES

  • Coronavirus Response

People in Prison Get Free Calls During COVID-19

During this pandemic, it’s so important to stay in touch with loved ones, especially for people in prison where the risk of outbreaks are among the highest in the world. Price-gouging by telecommunication companies who service prisons and jails is a serious problem; the industry scrapes $1.2 billion from poor people and communities of color every year. That’s why Color Of Change launched a campaign to take the burden off and make sure people in federal prisons can call home for free. After 18,000 members spoke up and signed our petition, federal prison officials relented. Now we’re asking leaders at state prisons, county jails, and detention centers across the country to follow suit.

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  • Media Justice

LA Times Removes Paywall for COVID-19 Coverage

After serious pressure by Color Of Change, the LA Times agreed to drop the paywall around COVID-19 coverage. Public health messages, especially tied to the dangerous pandemic we’re all living under, ought to be available to everyone, not just those able to pay for a subscription. The LA Times first wanted to keep coronavirus articles behind a paywall, but when we organized a number of groups to speak up, they relented. This helps reinforce an industry standard that media companies need to put public health information above corporate profits, especially now – and do everything in their power to make sure people understand how to stay safe, where to get tested, and what to do if they get sick.

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  • Media Justice

Barbie Gets Onboard with Black History

Dolls are a powerful way children learn about race and identity. When Mattel came out with a Black Barbie modeled after Rosa Parks, we pressed the company to share her full story rather than make a token nod to Black people’s struggle for equality. Mattel had originally whitewashed Parks’s story, saying she “led an ordinary life as a seamstress” until an “extraordinary moment” in 1955 when she refused to sit at the back of the bus. In truth, Parks was a community organizer and tireless fighter for justice for most of her life. Mattel worked with Color Of Change to revise Barbie’s story, giving children a fuller truth about Parks and recognizing women’s contributions to the civil rights movement. 

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Color Of Change helps people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force driven by 7 million members, we move decision makers in corporations and government to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people, and all people. Until justice is real.

IN THE MEDIA

March 3, 2021

The Black in Fashion Council Has Set Up a Road Map for Real Change in the Industry

The Black In Fashion Council was launched in July to propel the advancement of Black people in fashion and beauty. Now they’ve set out a plan of action. #ChangeFashion includes a roadmap and resources for racial equity in the fashion industry. Their statement says, “The goal of #ChangeFashion is to chart a course for industry change, and partner with executives, influencers and talent to make change a reality. It is a collaboration between those working for change on the inside of the industry, such as the Black in Fashion Council, and a powerful force for racial justice advocacy on the outside: Color Of Change. We can and must transform the fashion world as we know it, and make fashion a positive force for good—for everyone.”

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March 2, 2021

The Fashion World Promised More Diversity

The New York Times works to track progress in an industry where Black representation has been rare. They asked 64 brands, 15 department stores, and fashion magazines questions about the number of Black people on their executive team, boards, and staff—as well as in their ad campaigns and on their runways, shelves and magazine covers. The stats, and responses from Black creatives in fashion, show that the industry has a long way to go to increase representation, value Black talent, and avoid tokenizing Black models. That’s why Color Of Chang joined with the Black in Fashion Council, IMG joined, and supermodel Joan Smalls to launch #ChangeFashion, a racial justice initiative to transform the industry.

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March 1, 2021

New Instagram Filter Lets You Erect Monuments to Civil Rights Activists

Last spring, our nation began a long overdue conversation over the hundreds of Confederate statues and monuments across the country. Now we’re tackling a new question: who deserves to be remembered? The Pedestal Project is using augmented reality to honor 3 civil rights leaders: John Lewis, Alicia Garza, and Chelsea Miller. On Instagram, users can choose from a gallery of statues to project the image in the real world and hear a message from the activists. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson is quoted: “In their time, white nationalist officials erected statues of Confederate leaders for a reason – to send a message about who should dominate this country, and to put Black people in our place. It’s not enough to remove them, we must replace them with symbols of a just vision of America.”

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March 1, 2021

Ahmaud Arbery’s Death Sparked Some Policy Change, But 1 Year Later His Family Still Awaits Justice

One year later, justice for Ahmaud Arbery remains elusive–even with leadership changes in Georgia. Color Of Change President Rashad Robinson says the justice system is unequal and has historically allowed white people to get away with killing Black people. He says the nation needs more policies that ensure accountability for every case involving racist violence and more investment in Black communities. “When the killer is white and the victim is Black in communities around the country, justice isn’t served,” Robinson said. “There is nothing new about what happened to Ahmaud Arbery.”

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March 1, 2021

Fashion May Actually Become More Equitable, Thanks in Part to Joan Smalls

This articles talks about why the Black in Fashion Council was created and the launch of #ChangeFashion with supermodel Joan Smalls and talent agency IMG. Its aim is to make the fashion industry more equitable by wielding its economic and cultural power. A hallmark of #ChangeFashion is to make it easy for companies to make measurable progress with a roadmap for taking action. The first recommendation is to hire independent security for photo shoots and events rather than police. The others all focus on investment, into Black representation, portrayals, talent, careers, and communities.

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February 28, 2021

George Floyd’s Killing Started a Movement. 9 Months Later, What’s Changed?

George Floyd’s legacy will determine which America the next generation grows up in: one where record numbers of voters elect a Black woman to the White House or one where Breonna Taylor’s killer doesn’t face trial, but the officer who shot her neighbors’ wall does. As jury selection begins for the trial of Derek Chauvin, the House is set to vote on the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. It would ban chokeholds, end racial and religious profiling, eliminate qualified immunity for cops and mandate data collection on police encounters. Erika Maye, Color Of Change’s Deputy Dir. of Criminal Justice says, “It was really heartbreaking to see just how little progress was made to the point where a police officer could kneel on someone for almost 9 minutes, with people videotaping—and they could see folks filming them, with the whole world watching and not care.”

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Strategic Initiatives

Democracy & Census

Black people have the power to shape our democracy and set the agenda when they speak up and turn out in elections. Through our Black Brunches we have brought together more than 20,000 people across 20 cities—including many new to politics. Going into 2020, we have tremendous opportunities to register new voters, protect voting rights, and make sure our communities are counted and represented in the 2020 Census. We are engaging local leaders and our 1.7M members to help set a progressive agenda around criminal justice reform and boost civic participation in Black communities.

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Winning Justice

No one holds more power in our justice system than prosecutors. They decide who to prosecute, what the charges will be, and routinely make decisions that destroy Black people’s lives. We are ushering in a new era of prosecutor accountability by mobilizing Black communities across the country. Already, we've pushed prosecutors and candidates in a dozen cities make pledges to cut incarceration. We continue to build momentum to end the most unjust, destructive and racist practices in our system from money bail to over-sentencing, over-policing, and sending our children to adult prisons.

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COC Hollywood

TV and film play a profound role in shaping American culture. Yet, when it comes to representation of Black people, culture, and issues, far too much of the content Hollywood produces promotes dangerous misunderstandings that holds back racial justice in the real world. COC Hollywood is our initiative to change the rules in Hollywood by ensuring accurate, diverse, empathetic and human portrayals of Black people onscreen. We consult on film and TV projects, partner with changemakers inside the industry, work to raise standards around hiring and diversity, and elevate Black stories.

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