I’m a Writer on Emily in Paris. I May Destroy You Deserved a Golden Globe Nomination.

Color Of Change’s reporting on Hollywood — where 91% of showrunners are white and 80% are male — is cited in this article on how the film, TV, and music are still held back by largely white (and often close-minded) gatekeepers. Emily in Paris writer Deborah Copaken says the fact that her show was nominated for a Golden Globe for best comedy while I May Destroy You was passed over completely for nominations reveals “what is wrong with everything.” After a year of uprisings for racial justice, it turns out, when it comes to our cultural industries, America still has a long way to go. She asks: when we will start giving awards to shows that deserve them, no matter the color of the skin of their creators?

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For Black Pioneers Harris and Obama, Different Times Mean Different Approaches on Race

While Barack Obama campaigned for president in 2008 with explicit advice from his inner circle to downplay anything “that might be labeled racial grievance” or would emphasize him as a “the Black candidate,” things are different now. A dozen years later, Kamala Harris is able to lean harder into her public identity as a Black woman taking her place as second-in-command in an administration that has made closing the racial wealth gap one of its policy pillars. Color Of Change Chief of Campaigns Arisha Hatch is quoted. “Both of them are candidates that act as translators on race. We’re just in a different place as a country.” Democrats have realized they would not have won the presidency or control of Congress without the high turnout among Black voters and Black women in particular.

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PPP Loans Failed to Reach Communities in Most Need

Truthout republished this investigation by the Center for Public Integrity citing Color Of Change’s survey on the Paycheck Protection Program. The program, intended as pandemic relief for small businesses, never reached most minority-owned businesses. Entrepreneurs say the process felt Byzantine and inequitable. Most loans went to businesses in communities that already had access to resources according to the Center for Public Integrity. Meanwhile Black-, Brown-, women-owned businesses and those in lower income communities have gone under or hover on the verge of bankruptcy. COC Vice President Arisha Hatch is quoted. “We believe that instead of providing desperately needed relief to qualifying small businesses, the PPP propped up so many barriers and reinforced so many racial inequities.”

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Rashad Robinson Has Had Enough of Corporate America’s Empty Platitudes

Fast Company features Color Of Change’s work to push companies to get on the right side of history—whether they’re ready or not. What began 15 years ago as a scrappy digital upstart focused on mounting an online response to racial injustice is now one of the heavy hitters in American activism. Their latest victory is getting COPS taken off the air. It also led the charges to demand Facebook and other social media companies take aggressive action to rid their platforms of hate speech, pressuring hundreds of advertisers to temporarily pull their money. And now it’s targeting fast-food companies like McDonald’s and Burger King and retailers such as Nike for talking about racial justice without paying its workers a living wage.

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The Loudest Voice: Corporate America Needs to Get on the Right Side of History. Color Of Change Gets It There.

Fast Company profiles Color Of Change’s 15 years of groundbreaking to build a new racial justice movement and hold corporate America responsible for their role in holding back change. Our work to harness the uprisings after George Floyd’s death and turn that into real victories, from the cancelation of Cops to a corporate reckoning on race and equity is described in this article. “The organization’s presence can be felt in nearly every racial civil rights battle currently taking place in America—from corporate boardrooms to television sets to prosecutors’ offices and judges’ chambers.”

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Comparison Between Capitol Siege, BLM Protests Is Denounced

Black activists have come out countering the false narrative Republicans are spreading — equating the deadly siege on the Capitol with last summer’s Black Lives Matter uprisings. The latest right-wing effort to misrepresent the BLM movement, they are trying to paint Black activists as violent, anarchist extremists. But BLM leaders distance themselves from provocateurs. In a recent analysis of 7,750 BLM demonstrations in 2,400 locations across the US, it turns out 93% happened with no violence. Color Of Change’s Scott Roberts is quoted saying equating Trump’s rioters to BLM could lead to even heavier law enforcement, surveillance, and violence against Black activists. “There is a real danger of this false equivocation.”

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